Category: Grid

Small and medium wind sees dramatic growth in 2012

Small and medium wind sees dramatic growth in 2012

Last week industry trade body RenewableUK published a new report examining the condition of the UK’s small and medium wind industry.

The report, entitled ‘Small and Medium Wind UK Market Report 2013′ which can be found here, revealed that the industry is in a very healthy position.

Indeed the report revealed the fact that 2012 was a record year for the sector. 2012 was a record year in a number of ways. Firstly, the number of new small and medium turbine installations in 2012 represents an all time high for the industry and is a dramatic increase on the level of installations carried out in 2011. Secondly, the export market for small and turbines manufactured in the UK grew dramatically. Thirdly, job creation in the industry continued to accelerate. And fourthly a record amount of electricity was generated and fed into the national grid.

By the end of 2012 over 23,500 small (turbines of a capacity below 100 kilowatts) and medium(turbines of a capacity between 100 and 500 kWs) scale wind turbines were installed across the UK. The vast majority of these developments took place on farm land or rural properties. This is significant for a number of reasons. It demonstrates that small and medium scale wind generation is one of the most accessible forms of renewable energy generation. Small landholders and business operators are able to access the revenue which renewable energy can bring in. This is in opposition to many other forms of renewable energy generation where development costs and the need for large properties (such as those required by large scale wind farms) make development prohibitive for many. Additionally, small and medium wind generation is making a large contribution to the UK’s fragile rural economies. For instance agriculture is coming under increasing pressure on a number of fronts – spiralling  energy costs due to price increases in the international fossil fuel markets, reduced subsidies from the European Union, and poor yields due to bad weather. Small and medium wind developments (such as those undertaken by Intelligent Land Investments (Renewable Energy)) not only open up new and much needed revenue streams but can also serve to reduce energy bills particularly in energy intensive sectors such as dairy farming. This point was emphasised by several in the industry including  Gaia Wind CEO Johnnie Andringa:

“Energy Secretary Greg Barker’s ‘people energy revolution’ will in part, be built on “Local Wind Energy”. With retail electricity prices rocketing, energy generated largely for use on site, in rural homes, farms and businesses, delivers exactly what is being called for. A farm scale turbine is a world away from the wind farm: it can be the difference between a rural business being feasible or not.”

Steve Milner, Managing Director of UK company Earthmill made a similar point:

“More farmers are looking beyond traditional enterprises to survive and the financial benefits of wind turbines for farms are becoming more widely known.

“Over the last quarter, we have seen an increase in demand of over 150% for single-turbine surveys and power evaluations from working farms…It is giving farmers the motivation to look at renewables as an additional source of revenue, especially those in dairy, pig and poultry farming where large amounts of electricity are consumed.”

Exports of small and medium turbines manufactured in the UK have also dramatically increased. Indeed, more (almost 25,000) turbines of this scale were exported from the UK than were installed within the country in 2012. Growth has been so dramatic that the UK’s export market for turbines of this scale almost doubled in size in 2012 alone. Indeed the export is now worth over £100 million to the UK economy.

The growth in the manufacturing and export sector has also increased the industry’s employment levels and is building up the UK’s skill base. The small and medium scale wind sector saw the greatest increase in employment of any part of the UK’s wind and marine energy industries. A four-fold increase in jobs from 2010 to 2012. By the end of 2012 the wind and marine industries directly employed 18, 465 full-time staff. The last survey of this type was carried out in 2010 and reported 10,600 directly employed full time staff. This represents an impressive increase of 70% but the impact of this is offset by the far more dramatic growth of the small and medium wind sectors.

The level of electricity being generated from small and medium scale wind installations also saw extremely encouraging growth. 21% more capacity was installed in 2012 than in 2011. By the end of 2012 102 Megawatts of small and medium scale wind was installed across the UK.  This figure is of course outweighed by the amount of small and medium wind power which is currently progressing through planning departments across the country. Indeed the Glasgow Herald revealed last week that there are currently 500 live planning applications across the UK for small and medium scale turbines on farm land.  2012 saw an increase of 58% in electricity generation from and small and medium scale wind. The recorded generation level for the year represents 106,851 tonnes of carbon dioxide which was not emitted. An impressive figure and one which is predicted to dramatically increase year on year.

RenewableUK’s report also outlined some potential growth scenarios for the sector in the next few years. Indeed the report noted that the medium wind sector is predicted to grow dramatically in the years 2013 and 2014 even under the ‘least optimistic assumptions’. 2013 is expected to bring a four-fold growth the medium wind sectors installed capacity. The market for small and medium scale wind is expected to increase by 48.78% in 2013 and by the end of the year a cumulative capacity of 171.33MW is expected to have been installed across the country.

RenewableUK’s Chief Executive, Maria McCaffrey made the following statement upon the publication of the report:

“With about 20% of our population living in rural areas, it’s vital that we find ways of powering the rural economy, and wind is doing exactly that. This technology brings over £100 million into the rural economy and in the past couple of years we have seen the market almost double in size.”

We at Intelligent Land Investments (Renewable Energy) are doing everything in our power to realise the hopes of our landowners and help the UK to achieve the level of growth that the small and medium wind industry is capable of.

Scottish renewable energy offsets C02 emissions from transport

Scottish renewable energy offsets C02 emissions from transport

The significant strides that the Scottish renewable energy industry is making towards addressing climate change were revealed last week in the Scottish Parliament.

Scottish Government Energy Minister Michael Fallon was asked how successful Scotland’s renewable energy developments had been in displacing carbon dioxide emissions in 2012.

His answer revealed that Scotland has managed to displace approximately 10.3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2012. This represents an increase of 24% from the year 2011.  Renewable energy industry body Scottish Renewables would later announce that this level of displacement accounts for just under the total level of carbon dioxide emissions produced from Scotland’s rail and road transport networks. Given that the emission levels from these two networks has remained much unchanged between 2011 and 2012 we can then see that the 24% increase in carbon dioxide displacement can be nearly entirely attributed to the expansion of Scotland’s renewable energy generation capacity. Furthermore, given that the majority of new capacity stems from wind energy we can see that it is Scotland’s wind industry (companies such as ourselves at Intelligent Land Investments (Renewable Energy) which is driving the displacement of carbon dioxide.

Mr Fallon also provided figures for carbon dioxide displacement in England, Wales and the UK as a whole. England displaced 16 million tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2012, Wales 1.6 million tonnes ans as whole the UK displaced around 29 million tonnes. 29 million tonnes of carbon dioxide represents an increase of nearly 38% over 2011. As discussed in last weeks blog nearly all of the UK’s biomass generation is in England. Despite this Scotland accounted for more than a third of the UK’s entire carbon dioxide displacement.

The news was greeted enthusiastically by the renewable energy industry and other interested groups. Scottish Renewables Chief Executive Niall Stuart commented:

“Last week’s climate change report reinforced the need for concerted action to reduce carbon emissions if we are even to limit the impact of global warming, and these figures show that investment in renewables is already delivering results.

“Ten million tonnes is the equivalent of removing 99.1 per cent of carbon emissions generated from every car, bus, lorry and train journey in Scotland.”

“Renewables now generate the equivalent of 40 per cent of the demand for power from every home and business in the country, support thousands of jobs across Scotland and are making a massive dent in carbon emissions.

“The sector is delivering exactly what government wants – jobs, investment and lower carbon emissions from our economy.”

WWF Scotland‘s Director Lang Banks also stated:

“These figures clearly show that renewable energy is making a massive contribution to reducing Scotland’s climate change emissions. This contribution will only continue to grow as we move ever closer to securing all of our electricity from pollution-free sources.

“They certainly nail the lie by those who claim renewables, such as wind power, don’t make a difference. Renewables certainly do make a difference: cutting emissions as well as creating jobs.”

Also, this week a survey conducted by PwC (Pricewaterhouse Coopers) was published, revealing that 94% of energy companies are expecting ‘complete transformation of, or important changes to’ the power utility business model by 2030 as a result of growth in renewable energy and increases in distributed energy generation.

Distributed energy generation marks the move away from power coming solely from large scale power plants or even indeed large scale renewable energy developments. Small and medium scale renewable energy developments (such as those handled by ILI (Renewable Energy)) are becoming increasingly common up and down the country. Whilst the majority of these are providing power into the national grid others are generating power to be used locally; whether by communities or at on-site business developments. Such developments are expected to be become increasingly common in the next few years due to the existence of incentives such as the feed-in-tariff and falling technology and development costs.. PwC’s survey has already identified such developments as eating into the revenues of traditional power generation.

However, it should be noted that 82% of those surveyed view the increased use of distributed power generation to be an ‘opportunity’. Only 18% of those surveyed viewed it as a ‘threat’ to their business. It was also felt that energy-efficiency and smart grid technology could potentially have a similarly transformative effect upon the industry in the future provided barriers on the financial and technological side could be overcome.

PwC’s UK power and utility leader, Steve Jennings urged businesses within the power industry to seize the opportunities such changes present:

“Power utility companies will need to respond to these changes to not be eclipsed by technological and market change, while strategies that identify the best revenue opportunities in changed and, potentially transformed future market landscape, will be key to survival,”

These two pieces of news reveal the transformative effect renewable energy is having not only upon the power industry but this country as a whole. Great strides are being taken, by coompanies such as ourselves, to reduce carbon emissions, increase energy security and insulate the UK energy system from the volatile international fossil fuel markets.

 

Island Interconnectors would qualify for Green Bank funding

Island Interconnectors would qualify for Green Bank funding

Mike Mackenzie, MSP for the Highlands and Islands region, has confirmed with the UK’s Green Investment Bank that projects involving the installation of interconnectors  to Scotland’s Islands would fit their funding criteria.

The installation of interconnectors would offer several benefits to both residents of the islands and the mainland. Interconnectors would allow for renewable energy which is being generated on the islands to be transmitted to the mainland. This would open up a a large amount of renewable energy capacity to the UK’s electricity grid. Some of the country’s most suitable sites for renewable energy development, particularly in the marine and offshore wind sectors, are to be found in the isles. However the relative lack of energy demand on the islands acts as a hindrance to such developments. The installation of interconnectors would not only help to provide additional energy security to the UK’s electricity consumers and help to keep energy prices down it would also provide inward investment to the people of the islands.

The Green Investment Bank, which was launched in 2012, was established to provide funding to projects which would “accelerate the UK’s transition to a  green economy”. Already funding has been provided to a wide variety of projects including offshore wind farms, several biomass projects and hospital energy efficiency schemes. Interconnector projects, which would open up so much potential energy generation, would very possibly fall under the umbrella of offshore wind or marine energy projects which are at this time considered to be a priority by the Green Investment Bank.

An example of the projects which could proceed given the installation of interconnectors would be the proposed Beaw Field wind farm on the isle of Shetland. It has already been confirmed that the proposed project, which could produce up to 100 megawatts of power, will only proceed if an interconnector is installed between Shetland and the mainland. The installation of an interconnector itself is dependant upon another develoment on the isle proceeding – the 457MW Viking Energy wind farm which has been granted planning permission. The nature of these two schemes also demonstrates the onshore wind potential of the Islands.

Confirmation was gained by Mr Mackenzie at last week’s meeting of the Scottish Governments Economy, Energy and Tourism Committee, which was taking evidence from the Green Investment Bank’s Chairman, Chief Executive and Operation’s Director. When asked by Mr Mackenzie if the Bank would consider investment in interconnector projects Sean Kingsley, Chief Executive, responded that he felt this to be a “great idea”.

Following the conclusion of the committee Mr Mackenzie made the following comment:

“This is fantastic news for the Highlands and Islands. I am pleased to see that there is a possibility of investment from the Green Investment Bank and I will be following up today’s exchange in the committee with a letter to the bank to try and help turn those words into action.”

“Renewable energy projects, both large and small, on Scotland’s Islands are currently disadvantaged because they are unable to transport their energy to the grid. Because of their great natural resources their potential is massive – as the recent Scottish Islands Renewable Report illustrated –New submarine cables [interconnectors] are urgently needed to transport the significant amounts of renewable electricity which can be generated on Scotland’s islands to mainland consumers, so these interconnectors would be a great low-risk investment for the bank.

“I sincerely hope that this investment possibility is followed up by the bank, and I look forward to hearing further from them on this matter.”

Additionally, last week the BBC carried out an energy survey as part of Radio Five Live’s Energy Day. Energy Day saw an entire day’s worth of programming transmitted from a temporary studio powered entirely by renewable energy. Energy was generated from a variety of sources including solar panels, onshore wind turbines and even exercise bikes!

The survey, which interviewed 1035 adults, found that a significant majority of the public would be happy to see renewable energy developments take place in their local area. 67% of those surveyed would be happy to see more wind farms and 84% gave their approval to more solar developments.This is in stark contrast to shale gas fracking which found support from a minority of only 33% of the population.

Dale Vince, founder of British green energy company Ecotricty remarked; “The fact 67% of people support having more wind farms in their area is not a surprise at all – every public survey for the past two decades has come back with the same result.”

The survey also revealed the existence of  a generation gap in feelings towards renewable energy. Whilst a majority of 54% of those aged over 65 said they would be happy to see more wind energy developments in their local area this figure rose significantly to 82% of those aged between 25-34. It has often been said that renewable energy is the future. Demographics would seem to support this opinion.

The UK has some of the best renewable energy development potential in the world and the Scottish Islands have some of the best renewable energy development potential in the UK.  The installation of interconnectors between the Islands and the mainland would unlock a large amount of this potential. Providing energy security for all and much needed  inward investment to some of the country’s most isolated communities.

 

UK’s first large-scale grid battery connected in Orkney

UK’s first large-scale grid battery connected in Orkney

Last week a new type of storage battery was connected to the local electricity distribution network on the Isle of Orkney.

The new battery has the potential to be hugely important to the UK’s renewable energy ambitions as it could allow for far easier management of energy demand and would address the issue of power intermittency in renewables.

The battery was installed by Scottish Hydro Electric Power Distribution (SHEPD). The two megawatt lithium ion battery was installed at Kirkwall Power Station and represents the first use of a large scale storage battery anywhere in the UK. The battery was provided by Mitusbishi Power Systems Europe and Mitsubishi Heavy Industry after extensive trials in Japan. A similar piece of technology has been in constant use in Nagasaki for the last two years. Additionally similar battery technology, on a smaller scale, has been taken up by the electric car industry and has begun to enter the UK market. The battery will be operated by Scottish and Southern Energy (SSE). The level of cooperation involved in this trial is worth noting. Domestic energy companies, overseas developers and manufacturers, government and regulators have all been involved in this project. This demonstrates the importance with which storage and smart grid technology is being taken. Such technologies could be key to Scotland and the wider UK achieving their renewable energy targets and are being pushed hard at all levels.

The battery has been integrated with Orkney’s Active Network Management scheme. This network, or smart grid, has been in place since 2009 and was also delivered by SHEPD. Indeed, it was a world first. The Active Network Management scheme was implemented due to the relatively high level of intermittent renewable energy generation which existed on Orkney. Of course the level of renewable energy developments on the isle has only increased since then. The scheme allows the grid operators greater flexibility in managing and balancing loads and grants quicker access to back up power. This scheme has also proven highly beneficial to renewable energy developers as it has allowed them cheaper and quicker access to the grid following the completed development of a renewable energy project.

Reaction to the installation was universally positive. SHEPD’s Head of Commercial Mark Rough commented:

“This exciting trial will provide valuable research into the viability of using batteries for electricity storage. This is likely to become increasingly important to help balance the variable output from renewable forms of generation as we move to a largely decarbonised electricity generation mix.

“Although the installation of the battery will not provide an immediate solution to the current constraints on the Orkney distribution network, it is hoped that in the long term the result of the studies will help demonstrate that batteries could provide a cost effective way of freeing up capacity on the network to help facilitate new connections of low carbon generation.”

Scottish Government Cabinet Secretary for Finance, Employment and Sustainable Growth John Swinney remarked:

“Today’s announcement by SSE reinforces that Scotland is leading the way when it comes to developing and testing new ideas that may help us meet the electricity and energy needs of the future.  Smart grid technologies such as these being pioneered in Orkney are increasingly important as we move to a low-carbon economy.

“Scotland has an incredible wealth of energy resources from a range of generating technologies, capable of both meeting our energy needs and significant exports to parts of the UK and Europe.  We have a responsibility to make sure our nation seizes this opportunity.”

MSP for Orkney Liam McArthur stated:

““This is an exciting initiative and I am delighted to see Orkney leading the way in the development of energy storage options.  “Our islands have huge potential for generating renewable energy, but a lack of sufficient grid capacity is a growing problem. The active network management system has freed up capacity to allow many local projects to be connected to the grid in recent years, but new solutions now need to be found if Orkney is to realise its full potential in renewables. “I am certain that battery storage has an important role to play in ensuring we make best use of the resources at our disposal. While it is not a short term solution, the work being undertaken as part of this initiative could deliver significant and long-lasting benefits to Orkney and more widely.”

Peter Clusky, Senior Manager Renewables and Head of Government Relations for Mitsubishi Power Systems Europe said:

“We are delighted to be working with our strategic partners SSE to bring this globally significant R&D project to Orkney. We are confident that this Orkney-based project will make a significant contribution to the further development of Lithium-ion battery technology. Mitsubishi is grateful for the ongoing support of SSE, NEDO, and Ofgem.”

The battery project was funded by industry regulator Ofgem through their Low Carbon Network’s fund. Through this vehicle Ofgem has provided funding for several storage and smart grid projects across the UK. Again, it is worth re-emphasising the level of cooperation that has been involved in this scheme. It gives a very strong indication that the UK continues to view renewable energy as the future. Smart grid and other storage technologies will be key to realizing it.

This can also be seen in two other pieces of recent news. Firstly, UK Power Networks has announced it’s intention to trial a six megawatt battery system at  the Leighton Buzzard substation in Bedfordshire. When completed, which is expected to occur in 2016, this will be the largest battery system in Europe. Secondly, last week, UK Business Secretary Vince Cable announced the creation of a new Catapult Centre (centre for technology and innovation).The Energy Systems Catapult is expected to begin operation in 2015/16 and is intended to help accelerate the commercialization of smart grid and storage technologies, serving to reduce costs. Mr Cable gave the following comment:

” By committing to investment in new technologies now, we are laying the foundations for the high-growth businesses of the future. This will allow them to grow, take on more employees and keep the UK at the forefront of global innovation.”

The various developments which have occurred in this field over the last few weeks have demonstrated the commitment that the UK and Scottish Governments have to renewable energy technologies. Smart grid and storage technologies, such as the battery system currently being trialed in Orkney, will be key to unlocking the full potential of the UK’s renewable energy resource. The more energy which can be stored the more renewable energy developments can be utilized and less baseload backup will be required. Recent research produced by Imperial College London has estimated that large scale use of energy storage technologies could save the country £3 billion a year in the 2020s.

 

Reactions to Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2013

Reactions to Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2013

Government figures were released last week which show that the amount of electricity being produced from renewable sources is continuing to soar. The annual Digest of UK Energy Statistics revealed that the amount of electricity generated from renewables increased by 19% in 2012 compared to the previous year. Indeed in 2012 renewable sources provided 11.3% of the total electricity generated in the UK in 2012.

A spokesperson for the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) described the statistical data as “very encouraging” and emphasised that the UK was well on track to meet the agreed EU target of 15% of energy to be generated from renewables by 2015.The majority of the increase in renewable generation came from the wind industry: 46% more energy was generated from offshore wind in 2012 than in 2011 and 17% more from onshore wind. The huge leap in offshore wind generation can be attributed to falling development costs and long planned developments being connected to the grid. The more mature onshore sector still saw impressive growth as more and more people have sought to develop land; whether for large scale wind farms or small and medium turbine developments. That the UK’s wind industry has contributed so much to these impressive and headline making figures underlines the importance of the industry to the country and the scale of the opportunity that Europe’s largest wind resource has presented.

The data also revealed that the UK’s total energy consumption increased by 1.7% in 2012. While this information may initially raise questions about the energy efficiency programmes being pursued in the UK: a closer reading reveals that these programmes are beginning to bear fruit. The increase in energy consumption has been attributed to the cold weather experienced in 2012. When this is factored into the figures it is revealed that energy consumption was down 0.7% compared to 2011.

The publication of that data was greeted enthusiastically by the UK’s renewables industry. Maf Smith, Deputy Chief Executive at industry trade body RenewableUK released the following statement:

“These figures confirm the recent trends we have seen that show renewables, and especially wind, playing an ever-increasing role in our electricity generation. They come at the end of a busy period for wind, which has seen the largest offshore wind farm in the world opened at London Array, as well as number of major onshore sites going live. We have made some remarkable progress over recent years, and this is another shot in the arm for the renewables sector. With wind generating around half of electricity from renewables we are leading the charge in the race to decarbonise our electricity market.

“These figures also show that as a country we are becoming increasingly dependent on expensive imported fossil fuels, with a rise to over 40% in the amount we depend on fossil fuels brought in from abroad. This yet again shows the need to continue to build on the success we have seen in renewables as a way of helping us achieve energy independence.”

In other industry news the first section of Scottish and Southern Energy’s (SSE) new power line, which will run from Beauly in Invernesshire to Denny in Stirlingshire, has been energised. The long-planned line is intended to link up renewable developments in the north of the country with energy-demand centres in the central belt. This first section runs from Beauly to Fort Augustus. The entire project is scheduled to be completed in 2015 and will have capacity for 1.2 Gigawatts of renewable energy.

SSE’s Managing Director of Networks, Mark Mathieson, stated:

“This is a proud moment for SSE. Our progress is testament to the teamwork which identified the need for the line, guided it through planning and has now delivered the first section of the UK’s longest transmission line through some of its most challenging terrain.

“Over the past two years, the project has generated around £86 million in Gross Value Added (GVA) to the Scottish economy and created around 1,500 jobs. We hope to replicate the positive benefits from this project with the other grid upgrades that SHE [Scottish Hydro Electric] Transmission is progressing as part of a multi billion pound investment programme which will help increase security of supply, decarbonise electricity supplies and promote sustainable economic growth.”

Niall Stuart, Chief Executive of trade body Scottish Renewables, greeted the news with much enthusiasm:

“This newly upgraded line will help support many renewable energy projects in the north of Scotland, providing thousands of homes and businesses across the country with clean renewable electricity.

“Upgrading grid infrastructure is one of our biggest challenges in reaching the 2020 target of generating the equivalent of 100 per cent of our electricity needs from renewables and its major investment projects like the Beauly-Denny transmission line which will help us achieve this.”

These two pieces of news demonstrate the present and future success of the UK’s renewable industry. Developers, such as ourselves at Intelligent Land Invesments (Renewable Energy), are already delivering renewable energy in large quantities to UK energy consumers, counteracting rising gas prices and increasing the country’s energy security, but there is more to be achieved. Investment and projects such as the Beauly-Denny line and the Kintyre-Hunterston line (discussed in last week’s blog) will allow more renewable energy developments to progress and help ensure that UK and Scottish renewable generation targets are met. Such ambitions require progress to be made in a variety of fields; progress which is being made.

SSE to carry out £200 million grid upgrade in Argyll and Bute

SSE to carry out £200 million grid upgrade in Argyll and Bute

It was announced this week that Scottish and Southern Energy (SSE) is to carry out over £200 million worth of upgrades to the electricity transmission network between Argyll & Bute and North Ayrshire. Much of the investment will be directed towards a new subsea link between Kintyre and Hunterston.

The announcement was made after SSE’s plans received approval from industry regulator Ofgem. However, spokespeople for SSE have revealed that pre-construction work on the network upgrade has already commenced. The project is estimated to be completed by 2016.

The news is significant for both the local and the renewables sector. 150 Megawatts of capacity will be devoted to renewable energy developments. Renewable energy is an industry which has long been considered to have significant potential for economic growth within Argyll & Bute. However, some renewable energy developments in the area have been constrained by a lack of available grid capacity. Whilst investment in the area’s transmission has long been mooted now both local businesses and renewable energy developers can now proceed with certainty.

The network upgrade is good news for other reasons as well. Parts of both Argyll & Bute and North Ayrshire suffered from prolonged power outages earlier this year due to extreme weather conditions. The work to be carried out by SSE will serve to increase the local grids resiliance and make such events far less likely in the future.

SSE’s Director of Transmission, David Gardner commented:

“The announcement from Ofgem signals another significant step in our plans to reinforce the transmission infrastructure throughout Scotland.

“Along with completion of key projects within our approved budget of £1.4bn, this project demonstrates that we are gaining momentum on our capital expenditure programme which will connect significant amounts of renewable energy to the grid; contributing to energy security, economic growth and decarbonisation of electricity generation.”

The work to be carried out in Kintyre is only one small part of the £5 billion investment SSE intends to make into Scotland’s energy transmission network. Such levels of investment will provide a huge boost to Scotland’s renewable energy industry. There are currently developments across the country which are being delayed by a lack of available grid capacity.

However, in some cases, smaller renewable energy projects such as the medium scale wind developments carried forward by ourselves at Intelligent Land Investments (Renewable Energy) can make use of alternative solutions to a lack of grid capacity.

Ofgem’s approval of this grid upgrade work is the first to be issued under their new Strategic Wider Works (SWW) programme. SWW was introduced to consider funding for specific major transmission projects on a case by case basis in a timely fashion. A large number of transmission network uprgade programmes are being considered. We at Intelligent Land Investments (Renewable Energy) and within the wider renewable energy industry look forward to further approvals.

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